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View Full Version : Anyone put a fuel primer kit on a 1100 ZXI Jestski????



big e
08-17-2005, 09:31 PM
I'll be down at LOTO all next week and I was thinking of putting one of those primer kits on my 1999 Kawasaki 1100 ZXI. How hard is it to do? I am fairly mechanically inclined, however, when it comes to working on a weedeater or leaf blower, I usually end up throwing them in the trash because I end of throwing it across the yard after trying to work on those tiny things. I would somewhat classify the jet ski in the weedeater category so I am a little reluctant to mess with it. It runs great, but it is just aggravating starting it when its cold. I heard the primer kit works great once its installed. Any thoughts? Maybe I should stick by the old saying if it ain't broke don't fix it. Anyone on here ever put one on?

buck183
08-17-2005, 10:05 PM
A primer kit is a must for any ski. Once you have it you won't know how you made it without one.

What do you want to know abou the install. It's pretty basic. I've put about ten of them on myself.

If you're not comfortable with it let me know. I have a buddy that makes his living working on skis at LOTO. His house is around the 2mm and he has a shop in town somewhere. He's been to MMI and graduated top of his class. I raced with him for a long time. Good guy.

Let me know what you need me to do.

Buck

bills2k
08-17-2005, 10:35 PM
what exactly is a primer kit? is it like a priming bulb for an outboard motor? thanks!
my kawasaki jet skis have the same problem with starting.

buck183
08-17-2005, 11:07 PM
bills2k,

Yes, same basic principle.

Instead of a bulb you mount a push/pull plunger in the place of your choke shaft. It instantly pushes fuel into the carbs for a quick trouble free start. Much easier on the starter and engine after it's been sitting for awhile.

In some instances you will gain a small amount of performance too. When you install these kits you remove the choke butterflies out of your carbs therefore increasing air flow. Enough air flow can be gained that it's not uncommon to have to rejet the carbs after installing one of these kits.

Price of these kits is in the $20-$30 range.

Buck

hughey
08-18-2005, 08:23 AM
sounds interesting... I need three hands to start our ZX1100 when its cold. I end up turning the bars so I can hit the starter and hold the choke out with the left hand and feather the throttle with the right.

this sounds much better !!!! :oops:

twanger
08-18-2005, 08:54 AM
I have a 96 1100ZXi and a 94 750sx. The sx has a primer due to the performance mods it has a hard time starting, but with the primer it fires first try everytime. The ZXi is stock. I can get it to start first try everytime with the choke full on and throttle full and crank for 5 seconds.

Wildcat
08-18-2005, 09:32 AM
Just buy a 4 stroke! :)

Didn't know there was so many folks that were into or owned Jet Skis on here.

hughey
08-18-2005, 09:40 AM
gotta 4 stroke, but could only afford one so had to keep one of the 2 strokes.

the zx1100 is still fun to ride, smaller and lighter than the 4, but I enjoy riding the 4 and the kids ride the zx1100. [smilie=042.gif]

pebrown
08-18-2005, 09:45 AM
My Broth in Law had a couple of 1100s, Had the same problem. He's got a couple of Honda Aquatracks with turbos. Wicked fast, but no trim. Loves 'um!

GVL
08-18-2005, 12:15 PM
bills2k,

Yes, same basic principle.

Instead of a bulb you mount a push/pull plunger in the place of your choke shaft. It instantly pushes fuel into the carbs for a quick trouble free start. Much easier on the starter and engine after it's been sitting for awhile.

In some instances you will gain a small amount of performance too. When you install these kits you remove the choke butterflies out of your carbs therefore increasing air flow. Enough air flow can be gained that it's not uncommon to have to rejet the carbs after installing one of these kits.

Price of these kits is in the $20-$30 range.

Buck

I've installed many primer kits on stock and hopped up skis, I've never had to jet the carbs after removing the choke butterflies.

However, its a very easy install. Cut into the reserve fuel line and install
"T" fitting, be shore the clamp off the line first to prevent fuel leaking into the hull. One hose goes to the primer assembly(were choke was removed)
and the other goes to the carbs. two or three squirts and it'll start right up.

hughey
08-18-2005, 02:41 PM
[quote="glenn at glencove"][quote="buck183"]bills2k,

Yes, same basic principle.

Instead of a bulb you mount a push/pull plunger in the place of your choke shaft. It instantly pushes fuel into the carbs for a quick trouble free start. Much easier on the starter and engine after it's been sitting for awhile.

In some instances you will gain a small amount of performance too. When you install these kits you remove the choke butterflies out of your carbs therefore increasing air flow. Enough air flow can be gained that it's not uncommon to have to rejet the carbs after installing one of these kits.


now I feel dumb for not looking into one of these kits.. :oops:

big e
08-18-2005, 08:47 PM
Thanks for the tips Buck and Glen. Do you have to take the carburator all apart? Glen the way you describe it, it sounds like it is about a 1 hour or less install. Is that true? I am just nervous about messing with a carburator on something that runs perfect. I think I will go to the dealer look at the instructions and probably attempt it. It sure would be nice to have it fire right up, I am worried about burning the starter up. Do you fully remove the choke lever? Have have some pretty big hands and it did not look like there was much room to work in there with my big mits. I tried to find the instructions on line, but to no avail. Thanks for the help.

buck183
08-18-2005, 09:07 PM
Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

big e
08-18-2005, 09:29 PM
When you say choke plates I am assuming you mean the butterflies in the carb. Right? See its stuff like what you mentioned, that I bet the instructions don't warn you about. I would hate to drop that sht in the carbs. Thanks again.

buck183
08-18-2005, 10:09 PM
Yes, I mean butterflies.

Buck

SauDvet
08-19-2005, 10:38 AM
Does the 99 have the standard carbs or CV carbs? If you have the standard carbs, you do not need a primber pump, you have accelerator pumps on it, just pump the gas. You can still remove the choke plates. If you have CV carbs, you dont want to do either, just leave them alone.

Elrod62
08-19-2005, 11:30 AM
I'll have to try that primer on my 1100zxi, it's hard to start after sitting for week or so.

GVL
08-19-2005, 04:28 PM
Thanks for the tips Buck and Glen. Do you have to take the carburator all apart? Glen the way you describe it, it sounds like it is about a 1 hour or less install. Is that true? I am just nervous about messing with a carburator on something that runs perfect. I think I will go to the dealer look at the instructions and probably attempt it. It sure would be nice to have it fire right up, I am worried about burning the starter up. Do you fully remove the choke lever? Have have some pretty big hands and it did not look like there was much room to work in there with my big mits. I tried to find the instructions on line, but to no avail. Thanks for the help.

With your big mits it may take a little longer [smilie=265.gif] but rest assured its not too difficult. Just take your time and be very careful not to drop the very, very small screws that hold the choke plate to the shaft. Otherwise its a simple install. If you put a couple of paper towels in the carbs you should be OK.

GVL
08-19-2005, 04:34 PM
Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

Buck, Not trying to trump you in anyway and I agree with you with any increased performance is welcome, but with a stock setup he shouldn't have to mess with jetting anything. Back in the day when these things were wimpy out of the box you had to do everything you could to get more power, especially on the circuit.

buck183
08-19-2005, 10:24 PM
Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

Buck, Not trying to trump you in anyway and I agree with you with any increased performance is welcome, but with a stock setup he shouldn't have to mess with jetting anything. Back in the day when these things were wimpy out of the box you had to do everything you could to get more power, especially on the circuit.

Notice I said I raced....A LOT. :mrgreen: A racer never leaves anything "stock". It was rare for us to install a primer kit without adding things like flame arrestors, reeds, and other goodies while doing so. Therefore....rejet. I also said while it may not be mandatory, some performance could be gained from doing it.

This is in a timespan from 88-00. Man were those some fun times.

That's how I came across LOTO. They used to have a race there that I went to every year. After they quit putting it on I couldn't stop going to that place. I was hooked.

Buck

Buck

GVL
08-20-2005, 09:03 AM
I remember those days, stand ups and X2's sounding like chainsaws running across the water, I just got rid of my old suped up x2 last year.

SauDvet
08-22-2005, 10:32 AM
I raced both the 1100ZXI and 99 Ultra 150 both regionally and nationally and I want to emphasize that if you have the CV carbs on that year of ZXI, then I would not take off the choke plates. That carb uses the venturi vacuum to open the throttle slide, if you remove the choke plates, you will change the vacuum and the slides will not open all the way, and you will get a mean lean mixture in the mid range rpms. You will melt your pistons, believe me, I did it. There are some jetting options to those carbs, but you will gain nothing except for a possible engine rebuild. I think in 99 the ZXI still had the standard carbs, but I would make sure. If you only have 2 butterflies, you are golden, dont need a primer kit, but you can remove the choke plates. If you have 2 butterflies and a slide, I would leave them like they are and just use the choke.



Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

Buck, Not trying to trump you in anyway and I agree with you with any increased performance is welcome, but with a stock setup he shouldn't have to mess with jetting anything. Back in the day when these things were wimpy out of the box you had to do everything you could to get more power, especially on the circuit.

buck183
08-22-2005, 06:24 PM
I raced both the 1100ZXI and 99 Ultra 150 both regionally and nationally and I want to emphasize that if you have the CV carbs on that year of ZXI, then I would not take off the choke plates. That carb uses the venturi vacuum to open the throttle slide, if you remove the choke plates, you will change the vacuum and the slides will not open all the way, and you will get a mean lean mixture in the mid range rpms. You will melt your pistons, believe me, I did it. There are some jetting options to those carbs, but you will gain nothing except for a possible engine rebuild. I think in 99 the ZXI still had the standard carbs, but I would make sure. If you only have 2 butterflies, you are golden, dont need a primer kit, but you can remove the choke plates. If you have 2 butterflies and a slide, I would leave them like they are and just use the choke.



Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

Buck, Not trying to trump you in anyway and I agree with you with any increased performance is welcome, but with a stock setup he shouldn't have to mess with jetting anything. Back in the day when these things were wimpy out of the box you had to do everything you could to get more power, especially on the circuit.

That's why always rode Yamaha. [smilie=265.gif] [smilie=071.gif]

Buck

Christian
08-22-2005, 06:46 PM
I just got rid of my old suped up x2 last year


know of anyone looking to buy another :mrgreen:

97 X2, big pin 750 HPT ported motor, dual 44 sq bodies, PJS pipe, Jet Dynamics pump, setback, ride plate, top loader, UMI top stop steering, MSD total loss blah blah blah, all the good stuff for the time [smilie=265.gif]

it is in my garage right now, I did not even know there was a market for them anymore

SauDvet
08-25-2005, 01:36 PM
I raced both the 1100ZXI and 99 Ultra 150 both regionally and nationally and I want to emphasize that if you have the CV carbs on that year of ZXI, then I would not take off the choke plates. That carb uses the venturi vacuum to open the throttle slide, if you remove the choke plates, you will change the vacuum and the slides will not open all the way, and you will get a mean lean mixture in the mid range rpms. You will melt your pistons, believe me, I did it. There are some jetting options to those carbs, but you will gain nothing except for a possible engine rebuild. I think in 99 the ZXI still had the standard carbs, but I would make sure. If you only have 2 butterflies, you are golden, dont need a primer kit, but you can remove the choke plates. If you have 2 butterflies and a slide, I would leave them like they are and just use the choke.



Glen, you are correct about the "have to" part of my rejetting comment. I should have chosen my words a little more carefully. You have to remember I spent twelve years racing PWC at the regional and national level. Whenever you remove your choke plates that increases air flow to the carbs. This gives one the opportunity to rejet if they wish. Thus increasing performance somewhat. We all know increased performance is welcome. ;)

big e, You don't necassarily have to take them apart, but I would recommend removing them. There are some very small screws that need to be removed from the choke plates that could easily be dropped into the carbs during the install. Don't need to explain why this is bad. You can also generate small metal shavings when removing the plates that I would rather not have in my motor.

Buck

Buck, Not trying to trump you in anyway and I agree with you with any increased performance is welcome, but with a stock setup he shouldn't have to mess with jetting anything. Back in the day when these things were wimpy out of the box you had to do everything you could to get more power, especially on the circuit.

That's why always rode Yamaha. [smilie=265.gif] [smilie=071.gif]

Buck

[smilie=265.gif] well taken. I raced in the stock class mostly, the yamahas didn't do quite as well in those. They did kick some arse in the limited and SS classes though.