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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wichita, Kansas
    My Ride
    25 Outlaw 500efi
    Age
    34
    Posts
    432
    Post Thanks / Like
    When doing still shots in manual mode, I use a tripod and I take 3-5 shots of the same thing, every time playing with my aperature and shudder speeds. Adobe bridge gives me all the data back while viewing and it will teach you better how to operate your DSLR in manual mode.

    I also do whatever I can to keep ISO low. That way I don't ruin the perfect shot with a grainy image. My Canon S3IS was terrible about it, but I shoot with a Canon Rebel XSi now and it's a little more forgiving with ISO settings.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    IL/1MM GG
    Age
    43
    Posts
    659
    Post Thanks / Like
    I agree with low ISO and a tripod.

    I read a lot here - http://photo.net/learn/making-photographs/

    No matter what camera you are using, the right lighting is one of the most important things. Then figure out how to get your camera to capture it the way you see it.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    LOTO
    My Ride
    16' Polar Craft Jonboat
    Posts
    268
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    Best Tips

    Having recently purchased a DSLR, I agree with the PPs about shoot,shoot,shoot. I took the camera with me on a current trip to Disney World and shot many many photos. I shot in RAW and adjusted Whiet Balance with Photoshop. Here are three examples:





    A lazy squirrel has no nuts

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lee's Summit / Gravois 6mm
    My Ride
    Crownline 202 LPX
    Age
    46
    Posts
    321
    Post Thanks / Like
    I use a Canon D5 and am loving it too. I have some L-series glass, but my favorite lens is a 100mm Macro lens. I like to use a tripod and take close-up slow shutter speed pics of the corals in my reef tank. They make for some nice art pieces for around the house. Using a flash is a pain, so a 50mm 1.8 lens is great for shooting in low light. It actually takes great, blur free pics at night with ambient light. You can pick up a new one for under $150. I love my D5, but I think that we would use it more if it had a built in flash like some of the cheaper models.

    Adobe Lightroom is great for editing scale, exposure, and color balance. It is very easy to use. Photoshop is virtually limitless with the cool stuff you can do with your images.

    Corals with the macro lens - the piece in front is about 3/4" long:


    Some low light, long shutter speed shots on a tripod:


    A little color editing in Adobe Lightroom:

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