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  1. #1
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    Jan 2005
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    New flood plain maps released

    First Street Foundation https://firststreet.org/
    Ran across this article yesterday morning. The push is on to replace FEMA. I can see lending institutions getting behind the “CARFAX for homes” thing. It is definitely going to affect property values. I compiled the 6 zip codes around the lake. 65079 is shocking!

    https://www.delawareonline.com/story...629/112021314/
    What's the real flood danger in Missouri? New data shows the risk to your home. Particularly problematic are St. Louis and Camden counties, where 22,930 and 12,605 properties are at risk of flooding but do not fall within the federal flood maps, the highest discrepancies in the state.

    For some reason it won't let me post the jpeg of my spread sheet. So I will just tell you that there are 10,408 properties in the 65079 Sunrise Beach. FEMA shows 905 in the flood plain or 8.7%. First Street shows 4,570 or 43.9%. They show 50.2% in the 65324 Climax Springs area.
    Last edited by OzarkRick; 06-30-2020 at 07:14 AM. Reason: add pic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Cedar Rapids, Iowa- 1MM Grand Glaize
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    On First street, I pulled up 2 properties that I owned in 2008 when we had a bad flood. Each property had 7' of water in them on the main floor. The "Historical Flooding" map shows them as being dry. I am not exactly sure where they got their data, but like with anything, once you doubt part of the data, you doubt it all.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2008
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    I question the assumptions of this study, for one my neighbors house that is at least 50 feet above the 660 pool is showing flooding. If that happens Bagnell is breached and we have all kinds of issues.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Nebraska and 20mm LOTO
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    Quote Originally Posted by OP50MM View Post
    I question the assumptions of this study, for one my neighbors house that is at least 50 feet above the 660 pool is showing flooding. If that happens Bagnell is breached and we have all kinds of issues.
    Truman Dam would have a greater impact.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    I just checked mine and according to firststreet we're at extreme risk over next 30 years. That's crazy! If we flood we are all in big trouble. But like stated noe insurance will use this as a way to F*** us!!

  6. #6
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    Sep 2007
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    At around 667' water goes over the flood gates even if they are down. At around 670' water goes over the dam ( something it's designed for). My basement is about 680' so unless Truman Dam breaks completely and we get record rain amounts at the same time, I think I'm okay. But according to that website I'm a 1 out of 10 risk. However, so is the cliff property around the corner that sits 100' above the lake.

    I doubt that this website even considered the dam at all in their calculations, probably just stuff like elevations, run off area and rainfall calculations. But as other have said good luck convincing your mortgage holder you don't need flood insurance if the "Map" says your in a flood zone.

  7. #7
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    When I looked at the map I noticed the back of coves showing significant flooding, it appears to me that one assumption is all water is retained. I would suspect this probably wouldn't happen because of the flood gates and possible breach at Bagnell. Although, a Truman breach I would assume would send significant water down the Osage and back fill once it hit Bagnell. Allthough, I would suspect Bagnell would have significant issues then.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    I found this on a web page, it's reassuring the Bagnell could handle a breach of Truman and this was written before the work was done in 2018.

    The overall dam structure was poured in 40-foot wide blocks that are designed to slide in the event of a breech. Therefore, instead of a total collapse, only one or two sections would move back while the remainder of the dam would remain solid and undamaged. In the 1980s holes were drilled down through the dam and tensioning rods were driven through those holes and into the bedrock below. The effect was to anchor the dam more securely to the bedrock and render the whole facility as strong as a rock. The dam actually is more solid now than when it was built. Regular visual inspections of the entire dam take place to ensure nothing has changed. Even if Truman Dam, located some 93 miles upstream, were to fail, and the ensuing flood tide were to overtop Bagnell Dam, it would not be destroyed.

    http://www.lakehistory.info/damfacts.html

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Shawnee Bend Boat Ramp
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    Apparently, they use FEMA flood maps as it shows the flood plain behind my house an it is off by 4 to 5 feet. One reason why I got a LOMA. So, I find First Street Foundation not to be a credible source. That and flood insurance really doesn't cover losses to lower levels, other than furnaces and hot water heaters.
    What happens at the lake, stays at the lake. Unless I have a camera handy.

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